Caring For a Dog Teaches Kids how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar Responsibility

Dogs and kids go together like peanut butter and jelly. We had dogs the entire time I was growing up, starting with flag the beagle, then rusty, cinders and several other spaniel mixes, and finally a succession of rough collies, thanks to my love affair with lassie. We weren’t the most responsible dog owners —our dogs often roamed the neighborhood, and our females regularly had litters of mixed breed puppies. It wasn’t until I was an adult that I actually had how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar a dog die of natural causes rather than catastrophe, but we loved and cared for them the best we how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar knew how at the time.

I couldn’t imagine growing up without a dog. Many families today feel the same way. A big percentage of adopters from animal shelters nationwide are how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar families with children. Dog trainers often host entire families, kids included, in their training classes. Some offer training specifically for children and we’re frequently asked which breed is the best choice to how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar have around children. (see “ forget about breed and focus on a dog who adores how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar children” later in this article)

Parents often bring a dog into the home to teach how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar children responsibility. This admirable motive also serves to teach empathy because children how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar easily relate to their pets’ feelings. I’m sure that was part of my parents’ plan; they assigned the four of us kids the tasks of how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar feeding, walking, and cleaning up after our furry siblings. It worked for me. I decided by first grade that my life’s work would involve animals.

The goal of responsibility serves children well, with several caveats. Parents must be good role models for empathy and responsibility. If they threaten to “get rid of” buddy every time susie neglects her pet care duties, the message is that the dog is disposable, and the family hasn’t made a lifetime commitment to this living, breathing, feeling family member. Susie can shed her responsibility by saying in a pique how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar of childish anger, “fine, get rid of him!” even if she doesn’t mean it.

If the parents follow through on that threat, susie may suffer considerable guilt and grief, believing it’s her fault that buddy’s gone. Or she may grow up with a damaged ability to how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar fulfill responsibilities and commit to relationships, canine or otherwise. The results of that ruined human-animal bond can be in the kennels of shelters across how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar the country.

Parents must make it clear that buddy’s care can’t be compromised. They must step in to help, when necessary, to ensure he’s fed, exercised and groomed, and deliver appropriate consequences if the child neglects assigned duties— perhaps a loss of privileges but not the loss of how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar buddy. The lifelong commitment to and responsibility for the family dog how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar ultimately rests on the shoulders of the adults in the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar house, not the kids.

By the same token, mom and dad must model humane and respectful treatment of how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar buddy if they want susie to learn empathy. Positive training methods are ideal for teaching empathy, utilizing pain-free tools and techniques, and emphasizing the importance of understanding how dogs think, feel and learn. In contrast, old-fashioned methods that rely on coercion and pain administering tools how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar such prong collars and shock devices, teach susie that it’s OK to hurt living things, and desensitize her to buddy’s reactions when he protests the pain.

Good trainers welcome appropriate-aged children in their training programs. Children 8 years and up are usually mature enough to how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar participate in training classes, and younger children can help with buddy’s training at home. Even a 2-year-old can learn to lift a hand to his chest how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar as a cue for buddy to sit politely rather than how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar jump up. An 8-year-old can also assume primary responsibility for buddy’s care—with supervision—while younger children can help parents and older siblings with how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar dog care tasks.

Depending on the size, training, temperament and behavior of the dog, older children may be able to take buddy for walks. You can use two leashes to allow younger children to how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar help walk buddy—you hold one leash, your child holds the other, while you make sure your leash is always shorter so how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar you can absorb the impact if buddy pulls.

One of the most important things you can do for how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar your dog and children is to provide adequate supervision. Children under the age of 7 or 8 should always how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar be supervised when interacting with buddy, and sometimes older children, too, depending on the dog and child. An overwhelming percentage of dog-related maulings and fatalities occur with no adults present. It’s critically important to remember that any dog can bite. Period.

A child’s experiences with dogs can have a significant impact on how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar his perspective on other living beings as he matures. It’s up to you as a parent to ensure those how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar experiences are positive, so the child grows up loving, not fearing dogs, and learns how to be responsible for and caring toward how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar the lives that in touches in this world. If all children learned empathy toward all living things as how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar they grew up, what a wonderful world this could be.

I’m often asked what breed of dog I recommend for how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar kids. My answer: none. I could recommend a labrador retriever, a breed known for friendliness, and the family could adopt a lab who would maul how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar their child at the first opportunity. Far more important is the nature of the individual dog how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar and the preferences and personalities of the family members.

I tell people the dog they adopt should adore children, not merely tolerate them. A dog who adores small humans will forgive the inevitable how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar kid stuff the child does and come back for more. A dog who thinks kids walk on water won’t think twice about the occasional poke in the side. He’ll simply wag his tail when the toddler trips and how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar falls on top of him. The dog who simply tolerates children may be at the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar end of his fuse after one too many pokes and how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar bite the next toddler who stumbles. The headline will read “ dog mauls toddler,” and almost every time the article will include two quotes:

• “we don’t know how this happened—he was always good with kids!” well, he wasn’t good with kids. If the owners had been better at reading and understanding how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar canine body language, they would have seen the subtler signs of stress—such as the dog’s walking away—that signaled his discomfort and predicted the eventual bite.

• “the bite was unprovoked.” from the dog’s perspective, the bite is always provoked. Otherwise, he wouldn’t have bitten! What we usually mean when we say “unprovoked” is that the bite seemed inappropriate from our perspective and how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar we don’t understand why the dog bit.

It’s important to take certain qualities into consideration in addition how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar to the “adores children” trait when adopting a dog. Toy breeds tend to be fragile and are generally not how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar recommended for small children because they break easily. They can also become defensive and nippy when they feel how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar threatened, which occurs easily because of their size.

At the other end of the scale, the giant breeds and those known to have strong personalities how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar with the potential to do significant damage are often not how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar recommended. The more the size disparity between the child and the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar dog, the more important it becomes that you scrupulously supervise their how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar interactions—the potential for damage is greater.

It is also wise to consider an older dog, rather than a puppy, if you have small children crawling around. A young pup’s teeth are needle-sharp, and puppies explore everything, even tender baby skin, with their teeth. By the age of 6 months, a dog’s adult teeth have arrived, and he’s far less likely to chew on everything. Shelter and rescue groups are full of young adult dogs how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar given up by their owners when the novelty wore off how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar and the responsibility became too much of a burden. Consider giving one of those dogs a second chance at how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar at lifelong, loving home.

You see inappropriate kid-dog interactions all the time—on television, in advertising, in real life. Dogs in general are pretty tolerant—they put up with a lot of kid behavior I how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar wouldn’t allow without snapping. Still, your kids will be safest if you teach them to how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar behave appropriately around dogs. Here are six behaviors to teach our kids not to how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar do.

• hugging and kissing . As much as this is a loving gesture on the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar children’s part, many dogs don’t perceive it as such. These behaviors are often the cause of dog bites—and the kids’ faces are usually very near the dog’s mouth. Teach your kids to kiss their own hand and then how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar pet buddy with the “kiss”. Avoid hugging and kissing your dog yourself, at least in your child’s presence, as this will model inappropriate behavior. Your dog may tolerate your hugs but not your children’s—they may have less control over the amount of pressure how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar they exert, and they won’t read or understand your dog’s signals to stop. If you foolishly choose to ignore this advice, your children must absolutely understand it’sneve okay to hug and kiss other dogs.

• staring into a dog’s eyes . This is normal human behavior, especially for a child or adult who is somewhat fearful how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar of a dog. Direct eye contact can also be a strong threat to how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar a dog. Teach your child to look at the top of–or over—a dog’s head rather than directly at his eyes.

• teasing, pinching, poking or blowing at the dog . Kids like to see dogs react. They need to understand these behaviors are forbidden because they how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar annoy and hurt. Instead teach them to play fetch with buddy so the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar dog directs his reactions toward a ball.

• following and chasing . When a dog walks – and runs—away from a child, he’s saying he doesn’t want to interact with him. If the child follows, he’s pestering a dog and risks getting bitten. Teach your child to respect a dog’s choice to leave. If you have very young children, it’s a good idea to create escape routes for your how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar dog, such as low gates he can jump over while the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar children can’t.

• wrestling, straddling, riding or lying on the dog . Just because some dogs seem to tolerate these behaviors doesn’t mean they should have to. It’s sometimes a fine line between tolerate and bite. Wrestling encourages the dog to be inappropriately physical humans, while straddling, riding and lying on him can cause pain and trigger how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar a bite.

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