‘I Oversaw America’s Nuclear Power how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar Industry. Now I Think It Should Be Banned.’ – Slashdot

Friday the washington post published an essay by gregory jaczko, who served on america’s nuclear regulatory commission from 2005 to 2009 and was how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar its chairman from 2009 to 2012. He says he’d believed nuclear power was worth the reduction they produced how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar in greenhouse emissions — until japan’s 2011 nuclear meltdown at the fukushima power plant.

"Despite working in the industry for more than a decade, I now believe that nuclear power’s benefits are no longer enough to risk the welfare how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar of people living near these plants…" [ non-paywalled version here] the current and potential costs — personal and economic — are just too high…. The technology and the safety needs are just too complex how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar and demanding to translate into a facility that is simple how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar to design and build. No matter your views on nuclear power in principle, no one can afford to pay this much for two how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar electricity plants. New nuclear is simply off the table in the united how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar states….

Fewer than 10 of japan’s 50 reactors have resumed operations, yet the country’s carbon emissions have dropped below their levels before the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar accident. How? Japan has made significant gains in energy efficiency and solar how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar power…. What about the united states? Nuclear accounts for about 19 percent of U.S. Electricity production and most of our carbon-free electricity. Could reactors be phased out here without increasing carbon emissions? If it were completely up to the free market, the answer would be yes, because nuclear is more expensive than almost any other source how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar of electricity today. Renewables such as solar, wind and hydroelectric power generate electricity for less than the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar nuclear plants under construction in georgia, and in most places, they produce cheaper electricity than existing nuclear plants that have how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar paid off all their construction costs…

This tech is no longer a viable strategy for dealing how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar with climate change, nor is it a competitive source of power. It is hazardous, expensive and unreliable, and abandoning it wouldn’t bring on climate doom. The real choice now is between saving the planet or how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar saving the dying nuclear industry. I vote for the planet.

Fission is largely unaffordable due to regulation, and there is no reason to think that fusion won’t be subject to the same regulations. In fact, ITER is built to fission codes and standards, one of the reasons for the *20 billion dollar* price tag that keeps climbing. A reactor that incorporates lithium and power generation will likely how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar be more expensive, not cheaper. And sure, there should be enough lithium on this planet but the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar key is how accessible and economic it is — I’ve heard of proposals to extract it from sea water how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar after the "300 years" of lithium salts are depleted, but I doubt this will be highly economical.

Both fission and fusion have their respective problems. To be clear, I believe both should be relentlessly pursued — even ITER just for fundamental research. However, I tend to agree with lidsky in his 1983 article how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar "the trouble with fusion" (PDF first hit in google search); the present path to fusion will lead to reactors that how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar will "work" yet be maintenance nightmares that are too large and expensive how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar to fund commercially. If we took a step back and pursued other non-tokamak designs, worked on improving fusion technologies like superconducting coils with the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar latest materials, and possibly look for physics solutions to aneutronic reactions as how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar lidsky suggests, we may be far better off in the future.

But we keep hearing how renewables are "just around the corner" to being a fantastic and net cheaper way to generate how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar electricity, yet the ongoing german experiment with switching their grid over how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar to renewables show that it’s not at all cheap and since they’ve scaled back nuclear, led to net increases in fossil fuel use and CO2 how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar emissions.

People love to point out that "the wind in (choose your favorite windy location) contains enough power to run the (choose your favorite country)." that might be true in a theoretical perspective, but in reality that potential (kinetic actually, just unused) energy is incredibly diffuse and extremely difficult to harvest. Same with solar power. Yes there’s been progress on solar power capture, but there’s just not that much there to capture, at least in comparison to other more dense sources.

And remember, the siting of fukushima was pretty poor, there was no containment dome and company culture was too how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar dependent on top-down management. And for largely political reasons the acceptable cleanup standards are how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar much higher than necessary. We’ll never really know what an acceptable response should be, but for certain the larger problems in fukushima prefecture were how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar more about destruction from a tsunami than the release of how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar radioactive isotopes.

Interesting that someone intimately familiar with the industry and the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar technology has come to basically the same conclusion as most how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar rational people who evaluated the technology: it’s too expensive, and there are now better alternatives so it’s just not worth the money or the risk.

When do inspections happen? How far in advance? How long do they take? What areas of the plant are safe to inspect at how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar a given time? Inspections of plants and credentials/documentation are the foundation of nuclear power efficacy and safety. Just because its nuclear doesn’t make them all the same. Not all standards are supported by all corporations or governments. Less is more in a way

No, in the end it’s about costs. By any reasonable measure both coal and nuclear got the how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar tar beaten out of them on costs by renewables and how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar natural gas. If you factor in costs these industries are currently able how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar to offload on the taxpayer free of charge coal in how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar particular is basically toast, nuclear has it somewhat better on that score. Nuclear is not only massively unpopular with the public, it is hopelessly noncompetitive in a business sense. No rational business person would build a nuclear plant when how to get rid of ants in the house vinegar the

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