The how to get rid of black ants in my house surprising beauty and benefits of driftwood MNN DailyGreenWorld

Trees are pillars of their communities, a role they can maintain even in death. An upright dead tree offers vital habitat to certain birds how to get rid of black ants in my house and bats, for example, while a fallen tree is a bonanza for life on how to get rid of black ants in my house the forest floor, including future trees.

Yet rotting in place is not the only natural afterlife how to get rid of black ants in my house for a tree. Sometimes, instead of giving back to its birth forest, a tree will embark on an odyssey to pay it how to get rid of black ants in my house forward, carrying its ecological wealth away from the only home it how to get rid of black ants in my house has ever known.

These traveling trees don’t mean to betray their roots; they’re just going with the flow. They’ve become driftwood, a term for any woody remnants of trees that wind how to get rid of black ants in my house up moving through rivers, lakes or oceans. This journey is often brief, merely leading to a different part of the same ecosystem, but it can also send a tree far out to how to get rid of black ants in my house sea — and maybe even across it.

Driftwood is a common sight at beaches around the world, although many people dismiss it as unremarkable scenery or useless how to get rid of black ants in my house debris. And while some driftwood is a little short on mystique how to get rid of black ants in my house — like twigs from a nearby tree, or boards that fell off a fishing pier — it can also be a ghost from a distant forest how to get rid of black ants in my house or shipwreck, transformed by its adventures into something beautiful. Along the way, driftwood tends to return the favor by reshaping and enriching how to get rid of black ants in my house the environments it visits.

In an age when oceans are plagued by plastic trash, driftwood is a reminder that natural marine debris can be how to get rid of black ants in my house benign, even beneficial. It embodies the fragile ecological links between land and water, as well as the subtle beauty commonly hiding in plain how to get rid of black ants in my house sight. In hopes of shedding more light on these qualities, here’s a deeper look at why driftwood deserves more attention:

Rivers that flow through or near forests tend to collect how to get rid of black ants in my house pieces of dead trees, sometimes resulting in accumulations of driftwood known as logjams. Over time, these clusters can help build up the banks of rivers how to get rid of black ants in my house and even shape their channels, influencing not only the way water moves through the ecosystem, but also what kind of solutes, sediments and organic matter it contains.

Driftwood also slows down the flow of a river, helping it retain more nutrients to nourish its native wildlife. And by forming lots of different microhabitats within a river how to get rid of black ants in my house channel, driftwood has a tendency to boost local biodiversity, too.

Similar to long-lived beaver dams, driftwood logjams have been known to persist for centuries if how to get rid of black ants in my house left alone, eventually becoming huge, landscape-altering rafts. One such logjam, known as the great raft, may have been growing for 1,000 years before the lewis and clark expedition encountered it how to get rid of black ants in my house in 1806. The raft, reportedly sacred to the native caddo people, held tens of millions of cubic feet of cedar, cypress and petrified wood, covering nearly 160 miles of the red and atchafalaya rivers how to get rid of black ants in my house in louisiana.

For driftwood that leaves terra firma to begin a new how to get rid of black ants in my house life at sea, the odds of ever returning to land are pretty slim. But being lost at sea doesn’t necessarily mean their travels are a lost cause. As writer brian payton noted recently in hakai magazine, driftwood can stay afloat in the open ocean for about how to get rid of black ants in my house 17 months, where it offers rare amenities like food, shade, protection from waves and a place to lay eggs. As such, pelagic driftwood becomes a “floating reef” that can host a variety of marine wildlife.

That includes wingless water striders (aka sea skaters), which lay their eggs on floating driftwood and are the how to get rid of black ants in my house only insects known to inhabit the open ocean. It also includes more than 100 other species of invertebrates, payton adds, and some 130 species of fish.

As marine driftwood decays near the surface, it hosts a specific succession of tenants. It’s typically first colonized by salt-tolerant, wood-degrading bacteria and fungi, along with a few other invertebrates that make wood-degrading enzymes. (these include gribbles, tiny crustaceans that bore into driftwood and digest it from how to get rid of black ants in my house within, creating burrows that other animals later exploit.) these initial settlers are followed by secondary colonizers like talitrids, aka driftwood hoppers, that can’t digest wood on their own.

Gribbles are key colonizers of dead trees in shallow waters, but they aren’t the only animals that bore holes into driftwood. There are also bivalve mollusks like wood piddocks and shipworms, for example, which make their homes by boring into waterlogged wood. Although wood piddocks and shipworms are known for causing damage how to get rid of black ants in my house to ships, piers and other wooden structures, they also serve valuable roles in marine ecosystems, helping open up driftwood to a broader assortment of marine how to get rid of black ants in my house life.

After a year or more of floating near the surface, any driftwood that doesn’t wash back onto land somewhere eventually sinks toward the how to get rid of black ants in my house seabed. At a certain depth and pressure, “the ocean squeezes the last bit of terrestrial air out how to get rid of black ants in my house of the wood, replacing it with brine,” writes evolutionary marine ecologist craig mcclain. “so begins the story with a tree sinking into the how to get rid of black ants in my house deep.”

This descent, called a “wood fall,” claims driftwood ranging from small fragments to 2,000-pound giants, mcclain adds. It draws trees into yet another new ecosystem, where different communities of creatures are waiting to finish it how to get rid of black ants in my house off. This includes deep-sea bivalves of the genus xylophaga, which convert the wood into droppings that in turn support how to get rid of black ants in my house dozens of other invertebrates.

RELATED_POSTS